Silver on a Cloudy Day

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24mm
30th @ f/12.9
ISO 100
Canon EOS-1D Mark IV
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Silver on a Cloudy Day
A good tripod and very slow shutters combine to make a little silver from a cloudy day. So long as you don't mind getting your feet wet, or that tripod.

Sometimes the best sunset doesn't have any sun at all. We had planned to shoot some scenes of the summer sunset after work one day, but the clouds came in and filled the horizon with dark bands. Even better - if you like shooting seascapes with a very slow shutter. The sun was due to set around 9pm and we arrived at the beach around 8pm.

We drove along a few stretches to see if there were some interesting rocks exposed by the tide, something to add foreground interest. Over time you get familiar with a location and will know whether low tide or high tide will give you the best formation of rocks. Usually it's somewhere in between, and a quick check of the tide charts can help assess which day of the month to plan a trip.

Having picked out a bunch of small rocks near a breakwater we set about setting up. The key to this shot is getting your feet wet, and that means your sandles are going in the water along with the tripod. The Gitzo GT2541 has no metal parts below the head mount so I didn't have to worry about the salt and waves wrecking a brand new bit of kit. It's very light to pack yet really solid in use.

My favourite compositions were with the lens low down on the rocks. Shooting with a wide angle lens lets you give a large amount of prominence to small elements in the foreground, but you have to get close. This is where the near horizontal stance of a tripod is useful. I had two legs folded up short with enough clearance from the waves to keep my camera dry, but the third leg is fully extended and poked out sideways. This makes the platform incredibly stable and far more resilient to the wash of waves.

We need a very stable platform for 30 second exposures. Anything less than rock solid is a waste of time, which is why you should never go cheap on buying a tripod.

We're shooting everything with the camera locked down. I've locked off the autofocus and selected a manual exposure setting of 30 seconds at f/13. As you start to head north of this figure the physical size of your aperture is so fine that diffraction causes distortion of the image. I'm shooting with a prime 24mm lens, good enough to visibly detect the diffraction limits of the lens. If you cant see the difference in diffraction between shooting at low or high f-stops then it means your lens has other flaws that are causing yet worse aberrations.

Shooting such long exposures I'm not bothered about a cable release or even the self-timer. Any minor shudders from my clumsy fingers on the trigger will be insignificant against a 30 second exposure. I take a series of test shots to assess whether my focus is landing in the right spot. In essence I'm working with a hyperfocal distance, about 2/3rds back from the far horizon. But this is a subjective assessment as 'in focus' is a relative ideal. Some bits are more in focus than others, and by limiting myself to f/13 for the sake of image quality I have a limited amount of 'depth-of-field' to play with as well.

I'm using the noise reduction feature of my Canon 1D, a specific setting designed for long exposures that detects any aberrant behaviour of pixels. I want the best image for my capture as possible, trying not to rely on post-processing for everything. There is a limit to what you can hope to achieve on the desktop and in essence I'm a camera jockey, not a Photoshop jockey. The downside to noise reduction modes is they double the time to capture on image. The first 30 seconds is taking in the shot, and the second 30 seconds is the camera repeating the exposure in the dark to test for pixel problems.

Because I'm looking for a Black & White image at the end of my evenings work I've set the preview mode on the camera to monochrome as well. It gets me into the spirit of things and gives me a good idea of what my final shot will look like. There's not a huge difference between the cameras rendition and my tweaking on the desktop in Capture One.

After an hour of standing shin deep in water the light continues to drop and we reach a point where the ND400 filter is now too slow for my 30second exposures. At this twilight moment the exposures are still too bright without the ND filter, and we have to wait for a bit more darkness. It becomes apparent though that stumbling over pointy rocks covered in seaweed might be a little dangerous in the dark. Even more so when you're schlepping a tripod rig and your camera bag. One slip could be very expensive. The Gitzo might stand up to a dunk in the salt water but a full frame DSLR probably wont.

This put into perspective just how useful that little ND400 filter really is. I bought it with waterfalls and racing clouds in mind, but in fact a trip to the beach on a cloudy dusk is also ideal.

 

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Just The Facts


What's In The Bag?

Tripod / Gitzo GT2541
Carbon fibre legs on the GT2541 extend in 4 sections with twist locking instead of clips. Gitzo call this the G-lock and the system is very fast to unlock and extend, and very fast to slide back into compact form. There's also an explorer version of the GT2541 (GT2541EX) which gives total freedom in the leg angles. The standard gitzo has 3 positions that lock into place, while the explorer has a large flange to lock or release the angle of each leg.
gitzo.com

Tripod Head / Gitzo GH2780QR
This ball head is classic Gitzo, a simple design with one large locking dial on the ball, plus a smaller locking dial for the pan mode. A spirit level tucked into the neck of the head, above the ball, gives an accurate reading when shooting in portrait. The quick release plate on the Gitzo is a little unique as well, the two-stage release system proving a little confusing to learn at first but very effective once you get used to it. Two spirit levels and a bubble ball give good feedback when levelling, and the hardware is finished in a very industrial but tactile metallic coating. The legs lock fully wide at 90 degrees and the central column can be removed to mount the head directly onto the legs, giving you access to very low shooting heights.
gitzo.com

Slow Filter / Hoya ND400 77mm
Easily on of the more unusual filters in the Hoya range, the ND400 gives you around 10 stops of light reduction and turns daylight into moonlight. Almost. On a cloudy day by the beach this filter extended a 1 second exposure into the realm of 30 seconds, thereby producing dramatic effects from the wash of the waves.
hoyafilter.com

Lens / Canon 24mm f/1.4L II USM
In this case I was shooting with the Canon 24mm fixed lens but I could have done equally well with the Nikon version. This format is ideal for quality seascapes because you get a very straight image that a zoom lens cannot match. Shooting at the wide end of a 24-105, for example, simply wont yield the same level horizons or vignette free image. I'd have to step up to a Medium Format system to get a better image, and even then I'd need to buy the best lenses available. A Canon 5D MkIII or Nikon D800 with a 24mm prime lens is a combination that's hard to beat.
This feature was last updated on Wednesday 29th June 2011

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Feature written by / Ewen on Google

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  Australia  Photographic Field Guides  sunset  slow shutter  tripod  silk  ocean  water

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